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Check the UV Index Check the UV Index

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What is the UV Index?
The UV Index was developed by the National Weather Service and the Environmental Protection Agency. It provides a forecast of the expected risk of overexposure to UV rays and indicates the degree of caution you should take when outdoors. It predicts exposure levels on a 0 to 11+ scale, where values of 2 or less indicate a low danger, while 11+ signifies an extreme risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Get in the habit of checking the UV index. It is available online and printed on the weather page of many newspapers.

What’s the UV Index for my city?
Find the UV Index for your school or district by entering your zip code below.

Zip Code:

UV Index Expected Risk and Precautions
2 or less:
Low

A UV Index reading of 2 or less means low danger from the sun's UV rays for the average person:

  • Wear sunglasses on bright days. In winter, reflection off snow can nearly double UV strength.
  • If you burn easily, cover up and use sunscreen.
3-5
Moderate

A UV Index reading of 3 to 5 means moderate risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure.

  • Take precautions, such as covering up, if you will be outside.
  • Stay in shade near midday when the sun is strongest.
6-7
High

A UV Index reading of 6 to 7 means high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Apply a sunscreen with a SPF of at least 15. Wear a wide-brim hat and sunglasses to protect your eyes.

  • Protection against sunburn is needed.
  • Reduce time in the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • Cover up, wear a hat and sunglasses, and use sunscreen.
8-10
Very High

A UV Index reading of 8 to 10 means very high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Minimize sun exposure during midday hours, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Protect yourself by liberally applying a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Wear protective clothing and sunglasses to protect the eyes.

  • Take extra precautions. Unprotected skin will be damaged and can burn quickly.
  • Minimize sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Otherwise, seek shade, cover up, wear a hat and sunglasses, and use sunscreen.
11+
Extreme

A UV Index reading of 11 or higher means extreme risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Try to avoid sun exposure during midday hours, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Apply sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 liberally every 2 hours.

  • Take all precautions. Unprotected skin can burn in minutes. Beachgoers should know that white sand and other bright surfaces reflect UV and will increase UV exposure.
  • Try to avoid sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • Seek shade, cover up, wear a hat and sunglasses, and use sunscreen.

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